Ft. Stewart Soliders Giving Back to Homeless Veterans

By: A'riel Johnson

SAVANNAH, GA -- The Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless (CSAH) are using Tiny Homes as a way to shelter many homeless citizens of Savannah.

 

This will be an ongoing process to ensure that there is more shelter being provided for the homeless.

 

“This all came out of a non-profit strategic planning process, and one of the things that became very clear is that we had a critical shortage of housing for low income folks and no plan for building houses for homeless people,” Cindy Kelley, Executive Director, said.  

 

There is a plan to build six villages with twelve actual housing units. The first village that is being built will only house single adult veterans. The second village will have a slight change in the interior to allow for homeless couples.

 

Fort Stewart soldiers are currently in the process of building these tiny homes. The first village will be built on the base. The homes will then be transferred by Fort Stewart to Savannah, Georgia. Villages two through six will be built in Savannah.

 

All homeless veterans will not be able to get housing. Out of 285 veterans, only 72 units will be built. There will be a simple application process followed by a lottery to choose who gets housing. There are no priorities on the list, but there will be two exclusions.

 

Because the tiny homes property will be next to family housing, sex offenders as well as homeless people who have a history of violent felonies, will not be able to apply.

 

“We know there will be mistakes, but we are flexible in helping the homeless get back on track,” Kelley said.  

Besides housing, the CSAH is also assisting homeless people with preparing for interview skills and other resources so they will be able to afford rent. Even though some homeless people do receive funds, it’s still not enough for rent.

 

According to Kelley, rent will be set at $210 a month. This includes $10 a month for association dues as well as all utilities.

 

The cost of building a tiny home and an average small house is dramatically different. To build a tiny home, it costs $7,000 vs an average house costing $40,000.

 

The property on Aberdeen Street has already been purchased but site development is still underway.  Until actual construction takes place, there are still homeless camps on the property.

 

 

Room for One

By Kiana Colquitt

 

Cindy Kelley of the Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless Authority took us inside a model tiny home. Hear what she had to say about all of the things th tiny home offers!

Mo Money, No Problems

By Danielle Wardlow

Discover how much money you could possibly save by owning a tiny home vs a standard one bedroom home. Make more money and have less problems!

Helping Hands: Find Out What You Can Do to Help the Homeless

 

By Kiana Colquitt

 

An easy way to help out the homeless is by collecting basic necessities that they made need. Here's a list to get you started!

 

  • Toothbrush

  •  Soap​ 

  • Lotion

  • Sandwiches and other food

  • Water

  • Blankets

  • Gently used clothes and shoes

  • Deoderant

  • Sanitary Napkins 

  • Shampoo

  • Hand Sanitizer

  • Medicine

Add your own ideas to the list! Get out there and start changing lives!

Homeless, Humble, and Hopeful

By: Brea Dupye

 

Growing up in the city of Baltimore, seeing people who were homeless was a normal occurrence. Being taught to not give my dollar to everyone that I stumbled upon created a feeling toward them like Orajel on a toothache, numb.

 

Before taking on the adventure into the woods, the Executive Director of the Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless (CSAH), Cindy Kelly, warned us to not travel too far due to the unstable mental conditions some of the people living there suffered from.

 

Twigs snapped at the bottom of my feet as I walked further on the trail deeper into the woods, hoping to see a homeless tent community. Fear began to set in as I approached the open area that was filled with a cluster of tents belonging to some of the homeless in Savannah.  

After calling out for a response, a tall slender figure slowly emerged from behind one of tents. Without saying a word, his skinny black fingers motioned for to me to come closer. I slowly turned my head the other way as my stomach began to feel uneasy, regretting my stubborn decision.

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